Last Updated April 26, 2022 4/26/2022

12 Fairytale Castles in Portugal

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Portugal’s dramatic coastlines, rocky hills and green meadows are dotted with a collection of fairytale-like castles that offer insight into the country’s rich history. You can go on a castle-hopping adventure to admire ancient architecture at medieval castles and fortresses, then marvel at the iconic Pena Palace with its colorful facade. Read on to discover the fairytale castles you can explore in Portugal.

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National Palace of Pena, Sintra
Pena Palace

National Palace of Pena, Sintra

You simply can’t visit Portugal without seeing the National Palace of Pena in person. This famous castle is popular for its colorful facade and location at the peak of the highest hill above Sintra. Its vibrant colors set the tone for 19th-century romanticism and the castle is surrounded by a lush park where you can marvel at its fairytale architecture. This UNESCO-listed monument dates back to the Middle Ages and boasts elaborate Manueline and Moorish architectural details.

São Jorge Castle, Lisbon
Sao Jorge Castle

São Jorge Castle, Lisbon

Perched atop Lisbon’s highest hill in Alfama, São Jorge Castle is a great place to soak up nearly 1,000 years of Lisbon’s history. Serving as a fortification site for the Romans, Visigoths and the Moors, you can explore relics that remain intact, including cannons, underground chambers and 18 towers, one of which houses a camera obscura. Take a break with a glass of wine at the restaurant on-site or wander through the gardens to spot local wildlife.

Belém Tower, Lisbon
Belém Tower

Belém Tower, Lisbon

A white-washed tower located on the harbor in Lisbon, Belem Tower was once used as a fortress and guarded Portugal’s capital city. Dating back to 1515, you’ll find stonework motifs built in the Manueline style and a four-story limestone tower with a bastion connected to it and space for 17 cannons that could fire long-range shots. It now serves as a reminder of the power Portugal had on land and sea.

Castle of the Moors, Sintra
Castle of the Moors, Sintra

Castle of the Moors, Sintra

Built during the 8th and 9th centuries, the Castle of the Moors is considered one of the oldest preserved fortresses in Portugal. It sits high up in the Serra de Sintra hills, which means you can walk its walls to discover ancient battlements and UNESCO-listed landmarks. The most striking aspect of this castle is its impressive view that opens onto the lush valleys that stretch to the Atlantic Ocean, where you can marvel at the mountain ridges and cities below.

Guimarães Castle, Guimarães
Guimarães Castle, Guimarães

Guimarães Castle, Guimarães

One of the most important medieval fortresses in Portugal, the Guimarães Castle features walls in the shape of a pentagram and eight rectangular towers. Built in the 10th century, it later became the official residence of the father of the first king of Portugal and withstood the Battle of São Mamede in 1128. It’s now celebrated as the birthplace of the nation, where you can walk the ramparts and soak up the medieval ambiance.

Almourol Castle, Almourol
Almourol Castle, Almourol

Almourol Castle, Almourol

Located on the banks of the Tagus River on top of a small rocky island, the Almourol Castle is a sandstone castle that dates back almost 2,000 years. Once a military base for the Knights Templar, it was revitalized in the 19th century and offers a spectacular setting with its pocket-sized islet. The embodiment of medieval Portugal, it is best seen at sunset when the ancient walls are illuminated with floodlight.

Tomar Castle, Tomar
Tomar Castle, Tomar

Tomar Castle, Tomar

Once belonging to the Knights Templar, the Tomar Castle was built in the 12th century and includes a unique rounded tower. A former residence for the King Manuel of Portugal, it is a picturesque place to explore, as it overlooks the central town of Tomar and River Nabao. Step inside to explore the ancient landmark and discover the UNESCO-listed Convent of Christ, a former Roman Catholic convent and monastery with a grand Rotunda.

Óbidos Castle, Óbidos
Óbidos Castle, Óbidos

Óbidos Castle, Óbidos

Set within a beautiful village, the Óbidos Castle was a wedding gift from King Dinis to Dona Isabel. A treasure trove of medieval design, you’ll immediately notice its well-preserved limestone and marble details that add to its grand facade, which also includes towers in a cylinder and square shape. Admire its intricate details and meander through the rooms to learn more about the past rules of the region. If you really want to feel like royalty, stay overnight in the castle’s on-site boutique hotel.

Belver Castle, Belver
Belver Castle, Belver

Belver Castle, Belver

Originally built to prevent access to the River Tagus, Belver Castle was transferred to the Order of the Hospitallers after the defeat of King Sancho in the 12th century. Feel its history that dates back to the Middle Ages by exploring its interior, which features a small chapel built in the 16th century. Make sure to spend time meandering through the village of Belver and admiring the landscapes dotted with historic olive trees and hilly landscapes next to the Tagus river.

Leiria Castle, Leiria
Leiria Castle, Leiria

Leiria Castle, Leiria

Once a medieval fortress, Leiria Castle changed hands between the Moors and Christians a couple of times, then it was turned into a royal palace. Visitors come here to admire its beautiful Gothic arches that lead to a balcony with views of the city and countryside below. Its off-the-grid location makes it appealing for adventurous travelers who want to soak up the traditional charm and character of the Estremadura region.

Monsaraz Castle, Monsaraz
Monsaraz Castle, Monsaraz

Monsaraz Castle, Monsaraz

Attached to the walled medieval town of Monsaraz, the Monsaraz Castle is one of the most recognized castles in Portugal. Built from schist and limestone in the 13th century, it was designed to play a role in a network of border defenses against Spanish attack. It’s perched on a hill at the end of a picturesque cobbled road that winds through town next to white terraced houses that line its side alleys. Its remote location offers beautiful views of Barragem de Alqueva, Europe’s largest man-made reservoir in addition to the rolling countryside.

Marvão Castle, Marvão
Marvão Castle, Marvão

Marvão Castle, Marvão

Sitting on the central border of Portugal and Spain, Marvão Castle is perched on one of the highest points in the Serra de São Mamede. While it served as a natural defense against enemies in the 12th century, it now offers visitors a chance to walk around the preserved walls and take in beautiful views of the surrounding countryside and empty plains towards Spain. See its battlements and impressive cisterna, then admire its picturesque almond blossoms and whitewashed cottages that line the 600-year-old cobblestone lanes.

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